The14 Best Boker Magnum Folding And Fixed Blade Knives

The five best Boker Magnum

These 14 Knives Are The Stand Outs In Our Review of Boker’s Budget Magnum Line

Boker Magnum is what you call a budget line. It’s the kind of brand you go to when you need a new carry for uner $100. Magnum gets a bad rep and poor reviews sometimes for its quality, but you have to remember what the intention behind the brand is: It’s Boker’s way of selling their designs at a more reasonable price by using cheaper materials and an accelerated production method. This means you’re not getting the same quality from Magnum as you would from Boker’s other brands, but there’s also not a consistent quality across Magnum knives. Some are out-of-the-park terrible, but you can find plenty of gems in the sharp pile of cheap steel. Fortunately, you don’t need a perfect knife to have a useful knife, or even a fun knife, and those are the two categories Magnum knives typically fall into.

Magnum Folders

I honestly never expected to find nice folders from Magnum, but there is a thin line of practicality running through their designs. It’s buried in a sea of blades that look like they came from cartoons, but beyond that is a land of a solid pocket knives in a consistently affordable price range. Obviously there’s some good stuff in here for first knives or just for beating up, but I’d go so far as to set some of these next to a Buck or Kershaw in an EDC rotation.

Ironworker

The Magnum Iron Worker is a practical and versatile folder.

  • Overall Length: 7.75”
  • Blade Length: 3.5”
  • Blade Steel: 440
  • Blade Grind: Hollow
  • Handle Material:Aluminum with G-10 inlay
  • Weight: 5.32 oz
  • Lock: Liner

The Ironworker is probably one of the best heavy-duty pocket knives you can get in the $20-30 range. Just in terms of price for life and usefulness it’s hard to beat. It has a good-sized blade at 3 and half inches with an aluminum handle. I think what I like most about the Ironworker is its handle, actually. I enjoy the weight and durability of metal handles, but they’re always tricky to hold either because they’re slippery or just uncomfortable. I think with the G-10 inlay here and the way the edges are beveled this is about as comfortable as they could make it. This would make a great EDC working knife.

 

Blue Sierra

The Boker Magnum Sierra is a handy folding knife with a very grippable handle.

  • Overall Length: 7.1”
  • Blade Length: 3.0”
  • Blade Steel: 440A
  • Blade Grind: Hollow
  • Handle Material: g-10
  • Weight: 2.91 oz
  • Lock: Liner

The Blue Sierra is interesting, because overall it’s a slimmer style of knife, but the spine of the blade is a little thicker than usual at around 0.13 inches. It’s going to be a little blade heavy for that, because it’s certainly not going to balance out with a G-10 handle. That aside, it’s a nice-looking knife. If the handle were made from something a little nicer you could call it a gentleman’s folder. The combination of thick 440A steel and the thin handle make a very light, low-cost tool. It’s the kind of thing you can take around almost anywhere thanks to the 3 inch blade, and it should ride comfortably anywhere you carry it.

 

Co-operator

The Magnum Co-operator is a gentlemans knife with an outdoors-man feel.

  • Overall Length: 7.88”
  • Blade Length: 3.38”
  • Blade Steel: 440
  • Blade Style: Spear Point
  • Handle Material: Wood and Stainless Steel
  • Weight: 5.6 oz
  • Lock: Liner

Here we have something more along the lines of a gentleman’s folder: nice wood scales capped with stainless steel with a plain-edge, spear point blade. The colors of the knife are bold and clean and the design is just unique enough to be fun to look at. Setting the looks aside, though, this really is in the top 5 of Magnum folders. It’s a little on a larger size for a pocket knife, but that comes with a stouter blade and a thick, comfy handle. It has a good structure throughout, so I would almost consider it for bushcraft. I wouldn’t want to put it under too extreme of conditions. Even with good heat treatment, 440 steel is liable to chip if you start hacking, and I definitely wouldn’t want to tarnish that wood. But I also wouldn’t mind having the Co-operator in an emergency.

Click here to check out our in depth review of the Boker Magnum Co-Operator.

 

Backpacker

The Magnum Backpacker folding knife has a name that is appropriate for it's design.

  • Overall Length: 7.75”
  • Blade Length: 2.75”
  • Blade Steel: 440
  • Blade grind: Flat
  • Handle Material: Wood
  • Weight: 3.81 oz
  • Lock: Liner

This one might look a little funny as it has slightly more handle to knife than your typical pocket knife. The all-wood handle itself looks good, but it presents an interesting problem with the intention of the design. Magnum called this knife the Backpacker, presumably because it was made for extended hiking trips, but the wood handle really makes it better as a gentleman carry. You could take this knife to the office. You could break down boxes and get some compliments with it, but I wouldn’t want it to get caught in the rain for too long. The weight is right for backpacking, and I like the simple flat grind, but honestly I’d go for the Blue Sierra for that kind of thing. Get this knife for your home EDC. It should go great with your sweater vest.

 

Compact Rescue Knife

The Boker Magnum Rescue Knife is a great choice if you are looking for a compact EDC that is a great budget option.

  • Overall Length: 5.5”
  • Blade Length: 2.37”
  • Blade Steel: 440
  • Blade grind: Hollow
  • Handle Material: Aluminum
  • Weight: 3.0 oz
  • Lock: Liner

In terms of overall utility, this is probably the most useful knife I’ve come across from Boker Magnum. I’ve found that’s often the case with smaller knives. This beast of a runt would almost be a caper knife if it weren’t serrated. They clearly had slicing in mind when they designed the shape. The serration removes some use for fine cutting, but definitely gives you better cutting power in general. This is a tactical knife though, not a trophy-hunting knife. You’ve got a glass breaker and a seat belt cutter in a solid aluminum handle. This thing is clearly meant to be abused in an emergency. It’s not much for looks but definitely a good thing to keep in your glove box.

 

Magnum Fixed Blades

Since almost all Magnum knives are made with 440 stainless steel it’s a good idea to get something with a bit of heft to it. Fortunately, Magnum really likes to make gigantic knives. Actually I had to look specifically for smaller fixed blade knives that I could justify adding to this list just so I wouldn’t have to change the title to “A Hundred 10 Inch Knives for Some Reason.” Turns out they do make a couple of really nice smaller fixed blades, but the majority will be bigger than any rational person would ever need to own.

 

Persian

The Boker Persian FIxed Blade Knife is a great combination of tactical and outdoor at a budget price.

  • Overall Length: 9.8”
  • Blade Length: 4.3”
  • Blade Steel: 440
  • Blade Grind: Hollow
  • Handle Material: G-10
  • Weight: 9.5 oz
  • Sheath: Kydex

You find some descriptions trying to push this knife as an “oriental” style blade or handle or something. Ignore that. I don’t know what style “oriental” is, or exactly how giving a knife a curvy handle makes it Persian, but the Magnum Persian is a good tool. The hefty full tang is a good work around for the economy 440 steel. You get a long plain edge and a slight drop point with a false edge, then some G-10 bolted to the sides for a handle. They don’t try to do anything fancy with the knife. They just made a well-designed blade with a big handle that’s just barely modified for a more secure grip. This is exactly the kind of bushcraft knife you would take into the woods and beat the crap out of.

 

Lil Giant

The Boker Magnum Lil Giant is an ingeniously designed knife at a great price.

  • Overall Length: 7”
  • Blade Length: 3.6”
  • Blade Steel: 440
  • Blade Grind: Hollow
  • Handle Material: G-10
  • Weight: 6.29 oz
  • Sheath: Kydex

This is another big, solid Magnum fixed blade only in a more reasonable size. The blade is much more stout, with a severe drop point style blade. In terms of hunting and bushcraft this is about as tough as you’re going to get in the larger Magnum categories. The sheath leaves a lot to be desired (no surprises there), but the blade and construction are solid, with a thick spine and out-of-the-box sharpness. So long as you don’t smack it sideways too hard or leave it in the rain, this is probably one of the most long-lasting of the Magnums.

 

Lil Friend Micro

The Lil Friend Micro is an excellent neck knife that works well as a tactical EDC.

  • Overall Length: 3.37”
  • Blade Length: 1.3”
  • Blade Steel: 440
  • Blade Grind: Hollow
  • Handle Material: G-10
  • Weight: 1.34oz
  • Sheath: Kydex

I don’t know if the Lil Friend came first or the Lil Giant, but this runt was a stroke of genius. A plain edge on a leaf-shaped drop point style blade makes for a great neck knife design. And honestly, the shorter and fatter you can get a 440 steel blade the better. This knife has just enough of a point to give you some functional poking power, but the angle is still wide enough that you don’t have to worry about chipping. It works great as an outdoor knife and wouldn’t be a bad EDC, if you can find a comfortable way of carrying it without looking like an idiot. Personally, I think this style with the G-10 handle is the best Lil Friend, but it’s become popular enough for Magnum to make it in a couple dozen different variations. The stripped down version without any scales seems like an uncomfortable way to ruin a good design, but to each his own.

 

Breacher

The Boker Magnum Breacher is a creatively designed tactical knife with a tanto blade.

  • Overall Length: 9”
  • Blade Length: 4.25”
  • Blade Steel: 440C
  • Handle Material: G-10
  • Weight: 9.4 oz
  • Sheath: Kydex

This is Magnum’s chopper. If you’re looking to baton or carve out a few logs, this is what they made for you. They claim it’s a tanto style blade, but the top edge is a little too curved to be full on traditional tanto. That being said, I actually think the slight curve is a good feature since it’s meant for heavy bushcraft work and not piercing through samurai armour. For all your outdoor hacking needs, you have a full-tang build with a thick 3/16 inch spine all the way through. There’s a generous chunk of material across the whole knife which makes it heavy, but if you’re getting a 9 inch fixed-blade knife, it’s right about where you’d want it be. There’s some talk from people about using it as an EDC. That seems like an insane choice for anyone who doesn’t live a few miles into the country, but it will definitely come in handy on your next camping trip.

 

Ridiculous Magnums

I don’t think any of these knives will be useful. If you end up doing something useful with them, it’s probably because you’re using them wrong, but at some point we need to stop pretending all we care about in knives is their ability to cut boxes and make feather sticks. There’s a kid in all of us screaming “get that because it looks neat.” Here are a few that made me think that, anyway.

Spike Karambit

It may look like something from Star rek, but this knife has it's place.

  • Knife Type: Fixed Blade
  • Overall Length: 8.5”
  • Blade Length: 3.75”
  • Blade Steel: 440A
  • Blade Grind: Hollow
  • Handle Material: G-10
  • Weight: 7.34 oz

I’ve actually seen a few people talk about this knife like it’s something they would use everyday. I don’t know what for, but they seem to like it. I’m not really clear on the history of the Karambit style of knife, but my understanding is that it wasn’t made for hunting or cutting cardboard. Forgetting the blade shape for a moment, the thumb dip at the choil and the big ring at the end of the handle are actually nice features to have. They open up a lot for handling and carrying the knife. It’s just that once you add the crescent blade shape on top of them it becomes something you would use almost exclusively for fighting Chuck Norris.

 

Lima Romeo

Technically it is not a switchblade, but it is close.

  • Knife Type: Fixed Blade
  • Overall Length: 9.5”
  • Blade Length: 4.75”
  • Blade Steel: 440A
  • Blade Grind: Hollow
  • Handle Material: G-10
  • Weight: 5.64 oz

This gets touted as a tactical/emergency knife. There’s some truth to that. If someone told me the mission has been compromised because invisible preditory aliens were picking us off one by one, this might very well be the knife I reach for. But for almost any other thing I would do with a knife in an outdoor survival or urban emergency situation, there are a dozen other styles I would rather have. That being said, I’d be lying if I told anyone I hadn’t thought of getting this knife and covering myself with mud in the backyard to wait for that damn cat who keeps leaving dead rats around the house.

 

Ring-O

This knife has a weird design, but it is surprisingly practical.

  • Knife Type: Folder
  • Overall Length: 7.75”
  • Blade Length: 3.25”
  • Blade Steel: 440A
  • Blade Grind: Hollow
  • Handle Material: G-10
  • Weight: 5.0 oz

Okay, this might actually be handy to have. A big O ring just below the blade would provide some interesting options on grip that could be handy in certain situations. The main reason I put it under this section is because I think that ring is just going to get in the way most of the time. It’s a fun gimmick, but I can’t imagine it’s ergonomic for 90% fo the things you would use a knife for regularly. But I still kind of want it. It’s almost certain to be awkward, and the flip mechanism probably wears out easily, but there’s a big part of me that wants to pick this thing up and mess around with it for a while.

 

Outdoor Cuisine III

The perfect food prep knife for camping.

  • Knife Type: Folder
  • Overall Length: 10.25”
  • Blade Length: 4.75”
  • Blade Steel: 440A
  • Edge Type: Plain
  • Handle Material: Wood
  • Weight: 6.0 oz

I don’t know what to call this thing. It’s a cleaver that’s not a cleaver. It’s a folder, but likely too big to fit in your pocket comfortably. They say it’s a great outdoor kitchen knife, but if you’re cooking while your camping there’s probably a hundred other regular knives you could take that you can use to prep food and use for other stuff too. And they probably aren’t 10 inches long. The very regular 7 inch folder I normally carry around works fine for food and a hundred other things too. If I had the option though… I mean, if the Outdoor Cuisine III was just lying around, and someone asked me to cut the asparagus up, obviously I’m going pick up the Outdoor Cuisine III. Not because it’s necessarily the best decision, but maybe because it’s specifically not the best decision.

 

Damascus Lady Knife

The Boker Magnum Lady folding pocket knife is a quai version of the Buck 110 with Damascus steel.

  • Knife Type: Folder
  • Overall Length: 5.5”
  • Blade Length: 2.5”
  • Blade Steel: Damascus
  • Edge Type: Flat
  • Handle Material: Wood
  • Weight: 2.26 oz

As a rule I don’t really recommend Damascus steel blades. We should all know by now that those wavy lines aren’t making your steel any better. It’s entirely for looks. You can talk about metal heating and folding technique all day; the truth is no one is making true Damascus steel anymore. You just want a knife that looks fancy. But if you’re so keen on getting the stuff anyway, you might as well get it from Magnum, since they still make a passably  good steel, and you have better chances of finding a Damascus steel blade you can actually use at a fair price with them. And since you’re getting it for the looks, at least get a knife that looks good anyway. The Lady is a pretty solid gentleman folder (or lady folder, technically, I guess), with a classic design reminiscent of a Buck 110. It’s probably the closest you’ll get to a 110 in Damascus steel, because, last I checked, Buck had no intention of getting involved in this kind of nonsense.

 

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2018-10-22T00:27:52+00:00

About the Author:

Copywriter with vague delusions of grandeur. My time is spent aggressively oscillating between drinking coffee at my computer and running through the woods with pointy objects.
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